Being A Parent

Being A Parent

 

The relationship a parent has with their children can impact on your child’s education, friendship groups, positive values and social competence. Children’s development of social skills are affected by the nature of their caregivers and early life experiences. Those with strong attachments are most likely to succeed in school, are more able to reach out and relate to others and are able to follow a model of security to build on their own social skills. While it’s easiest to form a secure attachment bond when your child is still an infant and reliant upon nonverbal means of communicating you can begin to make your child feel understood and secure at any age. Children’s brains continue maturing well into adulthood (until their mid-20s). Moreover, because the brain continues to change throughout life, it’s never too late to start engaging in a nonverbal emotional exchange with your child. In fact, developing your nonverbal communication skills can help improve and deepen your relationships with other people of any age.

 

Developing your child’s resiliency

The Resilience Framework summarises a set of ideas and practices that promote resilience. It is based on a body of research and practice development called Resilient Therapy (RT).The following graph has been created to adapt the framework to different graphs.

Self-esteem is one of the fundamental building blocks of resilience. Principally, self-esteem flows from positive attachment experiences, but can be enhanced by participation in valued activities. It is about feeling successful, not simply academically, but also in other areas such as in relationships or in spare time activities. This means that encouraging children and young people to take part in activities which they enjoy can be an important source of self-esteem.